Are you stuck in a career rut?

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There’s nothing like heading back to the office following a fun-filled, chocolate binging Easter weekend to make even the happiest workers feel de-motivated! It’s OK to have an off day now and again, but if you find negative feelings creeping into your workday more often than not you could be in a work rut! You may feel like you’ve lost focus in your career, don’t have that same motivation you did when you started and are less and less productive in your day to day tasks. It can happen to the best of us, but instead of falling deeper into your rut here are 5 steps to help you get out of your career rut!

Identify the problem

Before you can make any big changes it’s important to work out exactly what the problem is. Are you in a toxic working environment? Do you crave more freedom and creativity in your projects? Is the stress of saving for a mortgage on your basic salary stressing you out? Whatever it is you need to understand if it is a problem in or out of work, because often our external stresses and worries can impact our work life. If it is work related, find out whether it is something that you can resolve in your current role, or if it’s time to explore new options. Once you’ve pin-pointed the problem it will make it easier to map out a plan to change it!

Don’t focus on what you will lose

A lot of people will stay in a job or environment that is “fine”, instead of reaching for something better. It’s often the fear of the unknown, you have stability in your current job and the thought of jumping ship into something new can make you think you’re better off sticking where you are. Instead of focusing on what you might lose, think about what you could gain. If you’re looking for a better salary, a nicer working environment and a more enjoyable job then don’t let the fear hold you back!

Map out exactly what you want

Identifying elements that are bringing you down in your current job role is essential to make the change, but instead of just fixing the bad things why not use the opportunity to go after something great! What are you looking for in your career? What excites you? What REALLY makes you happy? You may be looking for progression opportunities in your own organisation, maybe you want to retrain and start a new career altogether? If you’ve made the decision to make a change in your career you may as well go after everything you want while you’re doing it!

Get to research

You know what you want to change and you know what your main aspirations are, but before you step into a plan of action take some time to research. If you want to progress with your current company look into what you need to do to get that promotion. Hate your environment and want to jump ship? Take plenty of time to research other companies, looking closely at their Glassdoor and social presence to get an insight into the employer brand – you want to be sure you’re applying to the right places so you don’t make the wrong move!

Make a plan and take action

All that research should set you up well to make an informed plan of action to get to where you want to be. If you’re looking to move jobs, spend lots of time on applications, tailoring your CV and ensure your LinkedIn profile is up to date. Reach out to a recruitment expert as well, often recruiters will have strong relationships with companies and be able to send prospective candidates with the right skillset and fit even if they aren’t actively advertising for a role. If you’re looking to progress in your current organisation, create a business proposal and sit down with your Boss / Director to discuss your route to progression. Taking the initiative and showing your commitment to the company will not only boost your enthusiasm (helping get you out of that rut) but aid your case to get what you want in your job!

 

If you feel like you’re in a career rut but not sure where to start, contact the recruiters at Searchability on 01244 567 567 / info@searchability.co.uk.

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